What is shorting?

It’s like buying shares, but the opposite.

When you buy a stock, you think it’ll go up. When you short a stock, you think it’ll go down. Instead of offering to buy shares, you’re offering to sell shares.

Here’s how it works:

  • You believe a share’s price will go down.
  • You offer to sell shares you don’t currently own by placing a Short sell order at your price.
  • If someone places a Buy order to match your Sell price, then the trade is executed.

Then what?

  • If the price goes down, you profit! If it goes up, you don’t.
  • You can offer to buy those shares during live, or hold until the final payout.
  • Your “hold” is the short’s maximum exposure, which is the top payout ($25) minus the price of the share.

How about an example?

Jordan Spieth is currently T-5 in this week’s PGA event. You think he is overachieving and his price will come down from $14.

Seeing the current bid price of $14, you place a Short order for 3 shares at $14. Your cost is:

3 Shares * ($25 max payout – $14 price) = $33.

At the end of the tournament, it turns out your intuition was correct. Spieth fell to 28th place and paid out $6 per share.

Your profit is:

3 shares * ($14 avg cost – $6 final price) = $24. Woo!

FAQ

What is my maximum exposure?

If the share’s price increases, then your shares decrease in value. The worst case scenario is the player whose shares you have shorted finishes in first and pays out $25. We hold that “max hold” as your cost basis for the trade, which is $25 minus the trade price.

Can I use margin?

Nope. All trades must be covered by available balance in your account, whether they are short or long.

How can I close out of my position?

To close out of your short position, you can place a bid to buy shares (at or above the current Ask price to execute immediately), or hold until the end of the event. If you hold until the end of the event, then your payout is $25 minus the final share price.

Any other questions? Reach out to support at jockmkt dot com!